DE BUYER FK2 Asian Chef Knife, 6-Inch, Metallic Black

My latest acquisition is a DE BUYER FK2 Asian Chef Knife, 6-Inch, Metallic Black. I love De Buyer pans but I’ve never tried before De Buyer knives. I bought this one on a whim in Madrid’s El Corte Inglés, enchanted by knife’s beautiful shape. It’s proved as a worthy purchase, very light and thin blade is a blessing to work with and sharpen, the handle is super-ergonomic. Now I use it even more than one of my favorites – Wusthof Classic Chai Dao, 4177 / 17 Cm. In my opinion 6-inch knives are the most versatile knives in the kitchen and DE BUYER FK2 Asian Chef Knife is one of the best. On the heavy side of 6-inch specter I prefer Wusthof Classic 6″ Wide Cook Knife.

DE BUYER FK2 Asian Chef Knife, 6-Inch, Metallic Black

Miyabi 5000DP Gyutoh 200 Chef Knife 8-Inch

The Miyabi 5000DP Gyutoh 200 chef knife 8-Inch is the latest addition to my growing collection of kitchen knives. This knife is a typical Japanese Gyutoh knife manufactured by Zwilling J.A. Henckels Japan, the most universal chef’s tool with VG-10 core (actuall it goes under CMV60 designation which is pretty much the same as VG-10) at about 60 Rockwell hardness, sandwiched between 32 layers of stainless steel on each side, with damascus pattern.
The Miyabi 5000DP Gyutoh 200 chef knife 8-Inch
This knife, marketed at Amazon as Miyabi Kaizen 8-Inch Chef’s Knife, is very similar to Yaxell Ran 8-inch Chef’s Knife.

This is one of the best knives in my collection, definitely not cheapest at about $170. The knife is razor-sharp, a pleasure to handle and a beauty to look, though on a practical not I must admit that as a daily working horse Tojiro DP Cobalt Alloy 3-Layered Chef Knives F-808 (on the right) would be a more sensible alternative for about third of price.

Knife rack

What a Piece of Junk: KAI Seki Magoroku 2000ST AB-5251 Perforated Knife

I bought this knife for $26 as an alternative to considerably more expensive Wüsthof Classic Chef’s Knife – 8″ – Vegetable or Gourmet Ridge “Vegetable Knife” 8″. For all my skepticism about non-sticking properties of granton/ridged/perforated knives the KAI Seki Magoroku 2000ST AB-5251 Perforated Knife indeed performed well when slicing cheese or onion, at least for the first day of use while it was sharp out of the box. One day later the knife lost its edge, literally. No amount of sharpening will fix it, the knife is made from low grade carbon steel – any contact with water kills the edge.

Make no mistake, it’s a piece of junk. The KAI Seki Magoroku Perforated Knife feels flimsy (weighs about 110g) and cheap. The knife is very thin. The worst thing about it is oxidization – after three days of use the knife surface has darkened and small spots of rust appeared on borderline of non-stick strip and edge. What looks like a bolster is not a bolster but a thin metal rim. And it smells like cheap carbon steel though it’s supposedly made from molybdenum vanadium stainless steel.

Verdict: cheap is cheap.

KAI Seki Magoroku 2000ST AB-5251 Perforated Knife

KAI Seki Magoroku 2000ST AB-5251 Perforated Knife

KAI Seki Magoroku 2000ST AB-5251 Perforated Knife

Tojiro DP Cobalt Alloy 3-Layered Chef Knives F-807 and F-808

These two Tojiro DP Cobalt Alloy 3-Layered Chef Knives F-807 and F-808 are my favorite all-around no-nonsense knives, 7 and 8 inch respectively. Actually I use mostly the shorter 7-inch F-807, in my humble opinion it’s second only to Wüsthof CLASSIC Extra Wide 16cm 4584/16, judging by performance, ergonomics, maintenance and universality. The Tojiro DP Cobalt Alloy 3-Layered knife series deliver a great value, fantastic performance within $50-$70 price range. I prefer Tojiro DP Cobalt Alloy 3-Layered knives to more expensive multilayered Damascus knives. These knives are the very essence of function and engineering minimalism. Not only do they come to you razor-sharp, they hold their edge for very long with minimal maintenance. My only complaint is that both brand new knives come with some microchipping, though visible only under magnifying glass and negligible for practical purposes. Also mirror surface quickly loses its luster and is easily scratchable. All in all these are the knives I will not be without, enormous value.

Tojiro DP Cobalt Alloy 3-Layered Chef Knives F-807 and F-808

Making Honesuki out of Ikea Santoku Knife

Honesuki is the Japanese boning knife with characteristic extremely sharp triangular pointed tip. The angular knife shape is designed for cutting through the cartilage and tip for separating meat from the bone in nudging movement. The honesuki is great for breaking down chicken, deboning chicken, trimming beef and pork tenderloin and butterflying leg of lamb. The branded honesuki knives are pretty expensive:

Upon some inspiration I got an idea of remaking my old Ikea santoku knife into honesuki. This is the Ikea 5-inch SLITBAR vegetable knife that I used a raw material for this home project.

ikea-santoku-slitbar

I ground the rounded tip of santoku knife into the straight upper edge of the future honesuki and sharpened the upper edge. Here is the result. While my self-made budget-version of honesuki does not conform to strictest standards of the Japanese boning knives, it does the job of breaking down chicken.

Honesuki

Making Honesuki out of Ikea Santoku Knife

Japanese Seto Petty Knife, Damascus Forged Steel, 33 layers

The Seto petty knife is a great utility knife, a pretty much universal in the kitchen – whether for cutting or peeling vegetables or breaking down whole chicken. As long as you are not trying to chop bones the Sato petty knife is up to almost any task. The knife is 6 inch (150 mm) long and 1.25 inch (30 mm) wide at the blade base. The handle is red sandalwood. Hammered (tsuchime) pattern adds to knife’s beauty and eases slicing. The knife was razor sharp out of the box. Click the following link to buy SETO Japanese Chef Knives: Damascus Forged Steel from World Famous Seki, Japan (I-2: 150m/ m: PETTY KNIFE).

Japanese Seto Petty Knife, Damascus Forged Steel, 33 layers

Japanese Seto Petty Knife, Damascus Forged Steel, 33 layers

Japanese Seto Petty Knife, Damascus Forged Steel, 33 layers

Score (0 – 5)
Style & Design 5
Craftsmanship 5
Blade Material 5
Handle Material 5
Sharpness out of the box 5
Edge Retention 5

Yaxell Ran 5-inch Santoku Knife, VG10 stainless steel, 69 layered Damascus

The Yaxell Ran 5-inch Santoku was razor sharp out of the box. The knife is the piece of art with exquisite Damascus pattern, light weight and well balanced. It cuts veggies like butter, in paper thin slices. The blade is 5 inch long (125 mm) and 1.5 inch wide (40 mm) at the blade base. Edge retention is fantastic, just a few strokes of F. Dick 11-inch Multicut Steel keep the edge razor sharp. Click the following link to buy Yaxell Ran 5-inch Santoku Knife, 1-Count.

Yaxell Ran 5-inch Santoku Knife, VG10 stainless steel, 69 layered Damascus

Yaxell Ran 5-inch Santoku Knife, VG10 stainless steel, 69 layered Damascus

Yaxell Ran 5-inch Santoku Knife, VG10 stainless steel, 69 layered Damascus

Dicing vegetables

Score (0 – 5)
Style & Design 4
Craftsmanship 5
Blade Material 5
Handle Material 4
Sharpness out of the box 5
Edge Retention 5

Wakoli 1DM-SAN-MIK Santoku Damascus Knife, Japanese Damascus Steel VG-10, Mikata Handle

The Wakoli santoku knife is marketed by Oleio GmbH, Germany. In all likeliness it’s a Chinese or Taiwanese made knife presumably of Japanese Damascus steel VG-10 (69 layers). I say presumably about VG-10 because in my experience Chinese and Taiwanese companies manufacturing private labels quite often fail to produce Takefu certificates. Quite often Chinese and Taiwanese companies use AUS 10 or 440C steel for knife core, claiming thet the core is VG-10.

The knife blade is 6.5 inch long (165 mm) and 1.75 inch wide (45 mm). The distributor specs claim HRC 60 (+-2). Out of the box the knife was dull. It took more than a few strokes of Wusthof Diamond Sharpening Steel and a lot of honing with F. Dick 11-inch Multicut Steel Flat Fine Cut to make the knife reasonably sharp though not razor-sharp. The similar brands in the market are Zhen and Geva. The handle looks cheap and loses luster after a few hand washings. Edge retention is good.

All in all it’s not a bad knife for daily use at home kitchen though in this class I’d prefer Zhen for sharpness and better overall quality – click the following link to buy ZHEN Japanese VG-10 Damascus Santoku Chefs Knife, 7-Inch.

Wakoli 1DM-SAN-MIK Santoku Damascus Knife, Japanese Damascus Steel VG-10, Mikata Handle

Wakoli 1DM-SAN-MIK Santoku Damascus Knife, Japanese Damascus Steel VG-10, Mikata Handle

Wakoli 1DM-SAN-MIK Santoku Damascus Knife, Japanese Damascus Steel VG-10, Mikata Handle

Score (0 – 5)
Style & Design 3
Craftsmanship 3
Blade Material 4
Handle Material 2
Sharpness out of the box 3
Edge Retention 4

The knife is not that bad but I would not recommend to buy it. There are better alternatives in the same price range, Tojiro DP 8XX series for example.